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Artists of the Outback Creative} Julienne Bowser

Artists of the Outback Creative} Julienne Bowser

Who Are My Influences.

I’m influenced mainly by our great Aussie landscape photographers, Peter Eastway and Ken Duncan. I love how Peter is able to use his wizardry in post production to create striking, unique images. I love Ken’s ability to capture the spirit and grandeur of our beautiful country, in his large panoramas.

Available in three sizes 


Where In Australia Do You Find Your Influences?

Firstly, I like travelling and being on the road. Every moment a new scene passes the windows of my vehicle and every moment my eyes are framing up images in my head. I love the Kimberly region in WA and The Pilbara. The colours of the land there are amazing. In South Australia it’s the Flinders Ranges with is old ruins, and beautiful vistas. In NSW it’s places steeped in history. It’s the Snowy Mountains in Winter where beautiful snow gums are dressed in snow. I love the mountain huts with their charm and character and being where Banjo Patterson was inspired to write. In Victoria, it’s the autumn colours when the leaves change as in the little town of Bright. It’s also the Victorian Alps where again it’s the mountain culture. Tasmania, has so much packed into a small space. Like all photographer’s that visit there, Cradle Mountain is a favourite and The Nut at Stanley. In Queensland it’s the Gulf Country, chasing Morning Glory Clouds, (which didn’t arrive the season I was there but a flight over the area made it worthwhile. I love the Chanel Country and it’s interesting land formations.

I guess you could say I’m a “big sky” kinda girl. I love photographing the milky way with it’s “Emu” walking across a dark night sky. That sight alway inspires and gives me a sense of wonder.


Available in three sizes 


What do you find are the most difficult subjects to capture?

Ohhh! the odd time I have found old machinery, and I find that difficult to shoot, especially close ups of their bits ( I’m female after all hahaha) . Being a landscape photographer I’m usually working out compositions in an area sometimes before the car has come to a stop. Although I can shoot portraits, I’m not keen as I place too much pressure on myself.

Available in three sizes 


What makes you start to create a piece and how doe you know when you are finished?

On arriving back home or back to “base camp” I will firstly download and catalogue images onto an external hard drive. Then, I’ll take a closer look at the images I have shot for the day and zone in on ones I think kinda leap out at me as having potential. I check that I’m satisfied with the sharpness and then proceed with post processing the image. I’ll work on shadows and highlights to make sure they have detail. I try to get the composition right in the camera, so I don’t have to crop. I know I’m finished when I feel the image has that wow! factor without looking overdone. Sometimes if I’m not sure I’m going in the right direction with an image, I’ll call my hubby, to come and look over my shoulder. I gauge his reaction, and that tells me what I need to know.

Available in three sizes 


Do you have an artwork you are most proud of and why?

One of my favourite images is of Gostwyck Chapel.

This little church was dedicated to the memory of Major Clive Collingwood Dangar M.C. a late Major in the X111 (British Army) by his wife Nora Dangar, The Major was killed in WW1at the young age of 30. Ivy cascades does the external walls of the chapel and around ANZAC Day the Ivy turns vibrant red, which reminds us of his sacrifice. At that time of year fog around the chapel is not uncommon and helps to provide a somber ambiance to the scene.

Available in three sizes 


What is your most important artist tool? Is there something you can’t live without.

When I travel, I use a small laptop so I can catalogue and process images while on the move. I use a program called Affinity Photo for processing and love it more than Photoshop (and it’s way cheaper).

Available in three sizes 


What would you like to achieve out of your art? Where do you see yourself in a couple of years?

My dream is to someday have my own galley in a small country town. It will be made of old corrugated iron and will on the outside look like an old bush garage, with a front porch. In front of the garage will be two old petrol bowsers. This idea was inspired by my last name.

People will come and see the stories I have to tell and the memories I have made through my images and wish to enjoy the moments I have created and have them hung in their homes.  


If you would like to purchase any of the above images, please click on link below. 


Julienne's profile